Current CO2 concentration in the atmosphere

Hydrogen vaporware vs. the Big Battery Breakthrough

To no one’s surprise, there’s been some news lately about both a (potential) BBB (Big Battery Breakthrough) as well as RCH (Really Cheap Hydrogen).

Starting with the BBB, we have Japan’s Sekisui Chemical develop Silicon based 600 km range battery:

Sekisui Chemical has developed a material that can triple the capacity of lithium ion batteries, allowing electric . . . → Read More: Hydrogen vaporware vs. the Big Battery Breakthrough

Carbon bubble: Pop vs. deflate, doom vs. hope

Pete Sinclair has a good roundup of some articles about the general topic of a “carbon bubble”, which I highly recommend: Carbon Bubble anyone? “The Scientific Trajectory is Clearly in Conflict”

Just to make sure we’re all on the same virtual page, I asked Google to define bubble:

1. a thin sphere of liquid enclosing air or another . . . → Read More: Carbon bubble: Pop vs. deflate, doom vs. hope

We need to have an adult conversation about climate change

We hear the analogy endlessly: To fix the already unfolding climate change disaster, we need an “Apollo-like effort”, a “man-on-the-moon commitment”. This is a terrible analogy, and we should stop using it because it’s not just inaccurate, it’s devastatingly inaccurate, to the point of being counterproductive.

I was born just in time to be a starry-eyed . . . → Read More: We need to have an adult conversation about climate change

Natural gas, the media’s failures, and you

Dr. Donald A. Brown, Scholar In Residence, Sustainability Ethics and Law at Widener University School of Law, has posted a piece on this blog ethicsandclimate.org, US Media Fails to Educate The Public About Links Between Greater Natural Gas Use and Climate Change, that is a must read. With his permission, I am reposting it in . . . → Read More: Natural gas, the media’s failures, and you

This is how ugly denialism gets

As Lily Tomlin once said, “I grow more cynical every day, but it’s still hard to keep up.” That quote leapt to mind just a few minutes ago when I read that four Colorado Republicans who unanimously opposed Sandy relief funding are all now asking for (you guessed it) relief funding to help people caught . . . → Read More: This is how ugly denialism gets

Climate change and the phantom pause menace

Pete Sinclair, he of the Climate Denial Crock of the Week videos, has a new production that I can’t recommend highly enough, so here it is:

A few notes:

Of course “global warming” hasn’t “paused”, regardless of what the climate change deniers would have you believe. The fundamental issues: The amount of heat being trapped by greenhouse . . . → Read More: Climate change and the phantom pause menace

Climate checkpoints and bidding Dave Roberts goodbye

As I’m sure nearly all of you know, one of the most followed and generally reliable voices in the climate discussion, Dave Roberts, will be missing for a year. Dave is taking a sabbatical from the crazy train/open hydrant/treadmill/pick your own metaphor that is social media and writing to work on other projects and spend . . . → Read More: Climate checkpoints and bidding Dave Roberts goodbye

When this baby hits 88 MPH…

The title of this post is, of course, stolen from one of my favorite lines from the Back to the Future movies, when Doc Brown tells Marty, “If my calculations are correct, when this baby hits 88 miles per hour… you’re gonna see some serious shit.” That quote serves quite nicely as a colorful, if . . . → Read More: When this baby hits 88 MPH…

Sunday morning ponderable: Time travel

Imagine that you have a time-traveling camera, a device you can plop on a tripod somewhere and have it take photos from that position from future dates you specify. Imagine further that you lack the imagination to do anything truly interesting with such a thing, and instead simply plant it in the parking lot of . . . → Read More: Sunday morning ponderable: Time travel

The most terrifying climate finding you’ve seen (so far)

If you think the title of this post is a reference to the ongoing discussion about the Whiteman, Hope, and Wadhams piece in Nature about the economic impacts of a 50 billion ton methane release from the Arctic (see Climate science: Vast costs of Arctic change), a.k.a. the “$60 trillion” debate, here’s the good news: It . . . → Read More: The most terrifying climate finding you’ve seen (so far)